Body Recomposition – Part 4

What Does My Scale Say Now (at the start)?

My fancy lying scale tells me:

  • Weight: 202.8 lbs
  • BMI: 27.8
  • Body Fat: 32%
  • Body Water percentage?: 36.9%
  • Muscle Mass percentage: 27.6%
  • Calories max to hold weight: 2238

I set the scale for extreme sedentary when I purchased it.

I am skeptical of the Body Fat percentage number because if it is right, my LBM is 202.8 times (1-0.32) = 138 lbs. That doesn’t match the numbers from the Navy Calculator. But it could very well be right. I am going to track these numbers daily too.

 

Blood Sugar Levels During an Extended Fast

Here are some observations based on data of my Blood Sugar levels during a 25-day Extended Fast.

  • Blood Sugars go up significantly during the first few days of a fast.
  • The Blood Sugar “high” level is still nowhere near a dangerous level.
  • Blood Sugar peaks at 3-4 days into the fast and then drops rapidly.

  • Blood Sugars drop into the range considered low by the meter and stay that way through the rest of the fast.

  • The two high values are related to HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training Exercise). See my Cori Cycle BLOG post for more details.
  • After the fast my blood sugars are better than they were before the fast but I have added an exercise component to my routine.

 

Has It Really Been One Year?

Yes, it has been a year. Looking back where have I come? Lost somewhere around 75 lbs. At my college weight. Waist size of my pants went from 42 to a loose 34. Every suitcoat I have bought fits and most of them are really, really loose. All of my 18-1/2″ collar shirts are really, really loose. All of the 3X shirts in my closet are really, really loose. Trips to Goodwill to buy clothes to fill the gaps. Down to tee Large Shirts. Unsubscribed from all the Big and Tall clothing email lists.

But that’s not why I started any of this. I started this with the purpose of Hacking My Type 2 Diabetes. How has that worked out? Fantastically! My blood sugar meter shows my 90 day average at 110. I took a blood test on Friday so I will have to see what my HbA1C number is but it should be good. No longer on Insulin. The Medtronics Insulin Pump is gathering dust in a plastic shoebox somewhere. Thousands of dollars of insurance costs.

No longer on Metformin.I stayed on it until a couple of months ago and then decided to stop. Yes, my Blood Sugar is 10-15 points higher, but I am not on ANY meds for diabetes.

Right now I am fighting a nasty case of poison ivy and my blood sugars are “sky high” at 140. I’d be worried but I remember what it was like when I was on Diabetes drugs. My numbers would be in the 200’s with this sort of poison ivy case. So even with the stress of a pretty big infection I am doing pretty well.

In the past year I have done four ten day fasts. My last fast started after a weekend where the previous fast had just ended before the weekend (10 ten day fasts separated by 3 days). I also did several three and four day fasts until I discovered that day 3 is the “tough day”. It really is true.

What was an experiment a year ago is now a way of life.

Case Study – Remission of Diabetes

Interesting study of a woman who went into remission of her Diabetes (Case Study: Remission of Type 2 Diabetes After Outpatient Basal Insulin Therapy).

However, a few studies have demonstrated that drug-free glycemic control can be achieved in type 2 diabetes for 12 months on average after a 2-week continuous insulin infusion.

They felt that her instance was a one-off.

Here, we describe an unusual case of a 26-month drug holiday induced with outpatient basal insulin in a patient newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

She was in a bad way when diagnosed. I have never seen a A1C value this high:

A 69-year-old white woman (weight 72.7 kg, height 59 inches, BMI 32.3 kg/m2) was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in June 2011. She presented with an A1C of 17.6% (target <7%) and a fasting blood glucose (FBG) of 452 mg/dL (target 70–130 mg/dL).

What comes next is interesting.

She reported recently initiating a cinnamon supplement and switching her beverage intake from sugar-sweetened products to water and diet soda. Although the majority of her fasting SMBG values were controlled (80–110 mg/dL), she had experienced six hypoglycemic episodes (FBG 13–64 mg/dL). All values were objectively confirmed in the patient’s glucose meter, and the meter was replaced in case of device error.

So she added cinnamon and dropped sugar sodas and got fine. The doctors discounted most of that as you read on.

Another data point was:

During the drug-free period of March 2012 to May 2014, the patient maintained her lack of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. However, she reported having difficulties purchasing healthy food options because of financial constraints.

The conclusion was entertaining:

The purposeful remission of diabetes is not widely attempted or generally considered possible.

 

Tighter Blood Sugar Control Is Harmful

A study by Mayo Clinic doctors on Blood Glucose control (Glycemic Control for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Our Evolving Faith in the Face of Evidence). The study:

We sought to determine the concordance between the accumulating evidence about the impact of tight versus less tight glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus since the publication of UKPDS (UK Prospective Diabetes Study) in 1998 until 2015 with the views about that evidence published in journal articles and practice guidelines.

They noted the fact that:

There is also no significant effect [of tight control of glucose] on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, or stroke; however, there is a consistent 15% relative-risk reduction of nonfatal myocardial infarction.

They concluded:

Discordance exists between the research evidence and academic and clinical policy statements about the value of tight glycemic control to reduce micro- and macrovascular complications. This discordance may distort priorities in the research and practice agendas designed to improve the lives of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Metformin and the Fatty Liver

A study (Metformin in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A randomized, controlled trial).

Forty-eight patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were randomized to treatment with metformin (n=24) or placebo (n=24) for 6 months.

The study concluded that:

Treatment with metformin for 6 months was no better than placebo in terms of improvement in liver histology in patients with NAFLD.